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minutes from now. until then a look at comments by u.s. army chief of staff general ray odierno. he said friday the greatest threat facing our nation is fiscal uncertainty and potential budget shortfalls. >> good morning, everyone. i'm mike owe hand lan and on behalf of peter singer and everyone else here at bookings, for the 21st century hearing on intelligence. we're welcome to have general ray odierno to speak in what could not be a more important week for american defense policy making. you're aware of budget challenges of the process and how these can affect our men and women in uniform and future military planning and current operations. no one could be a more distinguished and thoughtful person who discuss these matters than general odierno who i have great honor to know a dozen years now. he has been a friend of brookings and the a friend of the broader defense community and he has been a distinguished servant in our nation's military and our nation's defense throughout that period. he took the fourth infantry division to iraq and presided over its operations, directed its operat
the u.s. and his country. you can see that live at 4:00 p.m. eastern. it will be on our companion network, c-span. we continue the prime time booktv programing later tonight looking at civil rights move. wed look at authors, mary francis berry and taylor brand. that will be. on c-span 3 tonight at same time, american history focusing on american artifact. we have smithsonian curator, eleanor jones harvey. she will talk about photographs and paintings from the civil war. all that here on the c-span networks. >> okay. folks. okay. we're going to get the second keynote speaker started here while you're enjoying your lunch. but first i would like to thank our gold sponsors for supporting us today. they are centurylink government, blue coat federal, hewlett-packard, info blocks, juner per networks, lockheed martin, net app, palo alto networks, red hat, red seal networks, taurus advanced, enterprise solutions and verizon. special thanks to those. as we enjoy our lunch i will introduce miss tina kune. vice president of northrop grumman and one of our diamond response source for today's -
prepare for defense against the threat to u.s. territory because of this coming capability, i think china is going to say, that's unacceptable. i'm hopeful. but at the end of the day as i say, the united states can't sit there waiting just for china. we have to be working with our allies on a comprehensive strategy, again, trying to let the region know that we want to be that important security guarantor. we also want to be a major trader, investor to the region and with asia-pacific. and for the stability and that trade and investment, and for prosperity and liberty to take root in this entry, any dynamic century with a rising asia pacific, it's going to have to take greater stability than north korea is right now letting it have. so for those initial comments, i will turn it back to our chairman. >> well, thank you, patrick the as always, very comprehensive argument. the floor is open. before we open the floor -- [inaudible] >> i want to pick up on patrick's point, and elaborate on what i see as the elephant in the room, which is china. outgoing defense secretary panetta told the house
year in the u.s. come involving transportation crashes, 32,000 of those occur on the nation's highways are 95% of all of our transportation fatalities. so what do i see is the biggest risks we face in our nation's highways? first, impaired driving. the ntsb on this issue in our most wanted list of safety improvement. where the top 10 list of things that they can be changed. and impaired driving really had up that list. that is the number one killer of transportation. 10,000 people every year are killed and impaired driving accident. they made recommendations based on a study was completed and released in december and so we be happy to talk with you all about technology and i mentioned that later. another issue that's gotten attention is distraction. they are ubiquitous in transportation our life and i see many of them on the table here inside sure many of you will be using some electronic devices later after the embargo. when we talk about distractions in all modes of transportation. i'm pleased to be our investigations in a series that your interest is. >> we paid extra for this good
in and impose the strategy he wants to with the full agreement of the u.s. government. this has all been very exquisitely coordinated. >> now jonathancast, katz, who lived in haiti, talks about the work to rebuild the country. it's 45 minutes. >> hello. thank you for the introduction. this is very cool. this is my first book, so if i look like i'm really not accustomed to this, it's because i'm really not accustomed to this. so the book is called "the big truck that went by." and there's a spoiler in the subtitle. how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster, i'm going to read to you a little bit about it and talk about it, and then i hope that we have a good discussion as this topic usually provokes. so i'm going to start by reading from chapter one, the end. before i do i'm going to give myself some water. this brand of water is in the book. had i known that i would have picked that section. i can try to look for it in a little bit. these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji, which i
night this week while the u.s. senate is on presidents' day break, we are featuring booktv in prime time. tonight, the financial industry of what led to the crisis. >> all of that live tonight on c-span. >> from the very start we told the board that the approach we're going to take, which was pretty straightforward, and remember, we were sent there to sort of fix gm. that was the nation, is go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused. i brought the message we were going to design, build and sell the world's best vehicles. we're going to move quickly. we need your support, and we need your input. and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or didn't get in the weeds on how you build a car, but the bigger question of financing, morale, positioning marketing, that sort of thing. the board was very supportive of that. and we kept them informed and you know, we just took off. >> leading general motors through bankruptcy and a government bailout, former chairman and ceo ed whitacre on "american tu
. arrested that we do via video so it works wonderfully. >> host: have you kept your u.s. citizenship? >> guest: oh yes. >> host: why? >> guest: my mother and father and my grandparents survived that for me. it is my duty. >> host: in "quitting america" the departure of a black man from his native land written in 2004 and by the way have you changed any of your views since the election of barack obama? >> guest: i remember my mother when he was nominated, hazel and khalia and i were in montrÉal. she called me at the hotel. she was i think 93 then. she said, and she was crying. [inaudible] i didn't need that telling. i always knew this. america is many places. it is a place that can be tolerant and accepting, a place where views can be moderated and differences can be reconciled. and i think a good deal of america supported vigorously the candidacy of a rock obama. and it's not only important to the black community. it's important to other americans as well. but he still faces a sort of vicious kind of ridicule from certain borders that are not unlike the america we saw when i was you
actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji which is, you know, caribbean geography, not in the caribbean. and it was sent at quite a lot of expense and quite a lot of effort. it was a very beautiful project for photographers to take pictures of these gleaming pallets of bottled water coming off these planes with the concept been that there was this incredible water crisis, incredible food crisis. the way it was often reported was haiti was on perhaps the verge of a famine following the earthquake. and there were real problems, then and you know, they're certainly needed to be a response, but this is an example of a response that was not very well thought out. it was a grenades just on behalf of the fiji water company. it was a lovely gesture, but it was sort of ridiculous because they actually do have water in haiti. it is an island, much like fiji, and what really need to be done was for the water to be purified and cleaned up and the existing system of water in system to be improved. and franklin long bef
for people to sort of get best practices, the rems technical assistant program at the u.s. department of education actually does still exist. they do webinar, they do have online information but, frankly, we should also try and follow that up with some more resources. i don't know if you want to comment on that, and then i'll be done. >> yeah. i know the ta does exist, but the grants are no longer being offered for localities. >> right. >> could i just say that the department of of education has brought the rems ta center along with the national center on safe and supportive environments that i lead together to make sure we coordinate our activities in response to these issues and to try to make those connections. >> thank the gentleman. mr. guthrie. >> thank you. thank you, mr. bond, for coming up from home. i appreciate you being here. and i know what happened in your school, the tragedy that was there, the way you reacted, your school, the paducah community is something that i know it still reverberates and there, and we appreciate you coming here to share your experiences. because
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
's with 93% of employers not using the program. outdated examples of e-verify errors. a u.s. citizen in tennessee actually receive an error notice from her employer. she went to the social security administration office to fix it. she thinks she fixes it at social security, but e-verify generates another error and she gets fired. another example, a u.s. citizen experienced an error because an employer made a simple mistake when they were typing the employee's social security number into the system. again, that worker went to a social security office, couldn't resolve the error there, e-verify generated a final nonconfirmation and the worker got fired. the most disturbing piece of all this is that for workers who lose their jobs because of an e-verify error, there's no formal process in place for them to get the jobs back and that's a problem for thousands of workers who experience these errors because you can imagine, these problems are only going to grow exponentially if we mandate the program. given these concerns, we have recommendations for how to move forward. first, congress ne
. [laughter] >> nine-zip, you know. now, as some of you know, as doug said, we worked noth the u.s. attorney's office, but the notion i was his boss is a complete joke. but it's always a privilege to be with him today, and it's a privilege actually to be included in this important annual meeting. i'd particularly like to welcome this organization's newest members. 11 state attorneys general who are participating for the first time and i'd like to recognize and thank all the good friends and colleagues here today. thank you for lending your time, you diverse perspectives and your talent to this association's critical work. over the past four years i've been fortunate to work with many of the leaders in the room to confront range of criminal justice, law enforcement, and national security challenges. alongside my colleagues and court parts in the obama administration, including vice president biden, director cordray, and associate attorney general tony west, all of whom you're hearing from this week. we have accomplished, i think, a great deal working together with you across state boundaries
i would estimate probably 40% of our ships are manufactured in the u.s. but we also come into your question, many facts are some in europe, facilities and japan were global manufacturing. >> to be a very small percentage right now. >> 10%? >> significantly less. >> are major components to your industry engaged in manufacturing these types of things in china. >> their other part that manufacture. we appreciate that investment. it says here we have $409 in this type of research going on. does that $400 billion annually, does that calculate with individual inventors put into the mix, or they just not part of the calculation? >> are probably not going to be significant percentage as measured by dollars but about 60% would come from private companies than 40% of the federal funded. >> were talking about private inventors and their impact on new discoveries. how is she placed them in terms of government programs coming up with something new, corporations coming up with something new versus the individual inventor community coming up with something new. >> if you look at the types of recr
subcommittee hearing friday morning. members will examine the challenges facing operations in u.s. airspace. officials from the faa and nasa are expected to testify. live coverage 10 a.m. eastern on our companion network c-span3. >> thursday at a senate banking hearing committee on dodd-frank financial regulations senator elizabeth warren of massachusetts, thomas curry, about prosecuting big banks when they break the law. here's a portion of the event. >> thank you very much, mr. chairman. thank you, ranking member. it's good to be here. thank you all for editing. i sat what he said. it's harder than look so i appreciate your being you. i want to ask a question about supervising banks when they break the law. including the mortgage foreclosure of others as well. we all understand why settlements are important, that trials are expensive and we can't dedicate huge resources to them. but we also understand that it's a party is unwilling to go to trial, either because it's too timid are because they lack resources, that the consequence is that a lot less leverage in all the settlements that occ
's nominee to be u.s. representative to the united nations. now some presidents include that position in their cabinet. some do not. but astpraoeud that singular insurance -- aside from that sing latin incident which i pointous was the democrats saying they're going to filibuster a nominee by the president and deny him a seat, so far as i've been able to tell there's not been ever an instant in the history of the senate where republicans have used a filibuster to deny a cabinet member an up-or-down vote when nominated by a president. that only leaves appellate judge nominations, circuit judge nominees. up until 2003, so far as i've been able to find, the rule of the senate was that the president's nominees to be on the federal courts of appeal always received an up-or-down vote. they were decided by a vote of 51. then our friends on the democratic side when president bush became president decided they didn't like that, and they changed the practice. they began to filibuster president bush's judges for up or down -- to deny them their seats. i had just arrived in the senate in 2003, mr
communities, the commission recommends that the rural housing programs remain at the u.s. department of agriculture, one agency dedicated to and present in rural america. he lived there, they know what the problems are, and the people there trust them. we also recommend extending the current definition of rural areas, to ensure that rural communities continue to have access to the system that rural housing programs can provide. we also urge that they be carefully examined and the operations be examined for modification. these programs are currently underfunded despite an impressive track record. they need, for example, a slightly more increased application process and the underwriting as well. we know it is a difficult time to talk about spending. these recommendations will be no small sum to jump. counseling and stable rule housing are important elements. with that, i turn it over to my good friend whom i was named by "the wall street journal" many years ago as the odd couple because of our ability to work across the aisle. when he was secretary and i was with him. [applause] >> tha
when needed. the fiscal outlook which the u.s. army faces in fiscal year '13 is dire and to my knowledge unprecedented. in addition to the $180 billion. the combination of the continuing resolution a shortfall -- excuse me, the shortfall in oversays contingency operation funds for afghanistan and the sequester and fiscal year 2013 has resulted in a 17 to $18 billion shortfall to the army's operation and maintenance accounts. as well as an additional $6 billion to other programs. all of this will come in remaining seven months of this year. the fiscal year 2013 fiscal situation -- impact on all forces not serving in afghanistan or forward in korea. impacts which will have a significant impact to fiscal year 2014 and beyond. just a few of the acts we will be forced to take, are for example, we will curtail training for 80% of ground forces. this will impact our unit's basic warfighting skills and shortfall across critical specialty including aviation, intelligence, engineering, and even our ability to recruit soldiers in to our army. we have directed an immediate army hard wiring
more than three quarters of the u.s. senate approving the bill that included key provisions for native women. our victories notches in the united states. today is the day. activists around the world will be hosting events as part of the one alien rising to end violence against women and girls. finally, i want to thank the many tribal and public radio stations across the country for any today's address. bring in the state of andean nations to hundreds and thousands of people in any country and beyond. now it is my pleasure to introduce the president of the national american indians. jefferson keel. currently oklahoma u.s. army officer with over 20 years of active duty service and is translated that into a sense of duty and serving indian country and protect in advancing our sovereignty. over his two terms, he is been a two state for indian country. president keel has met with president upon and engaged at the president's cabinet and traveled overseas to educate foreign leaders about our unique nation-to-nation relationship. he has championed health care, were tired with the promise of t
that border really well. i mean, i was the u.s. attorney in arizona and i'm from new mexico originally. i have worked that border my whole life and that border now is as secure in the last two decades. it doesn't mean we don't have more to do. there is always more to do but it's in been an unprecedented and historic effort and now because of a budget impasse, you have to begin to look at rolling back those agents and slowing hiring and getting rid of overtime which we use a lot between the ports of entry. that will have a real impact. >> just a few months ago governor jindal from louisiana was outside and he accused the president of trying to scare people. can you say for the record that you were not here just trying to scare people and what you are saying has to happen and is a necessity as a result of these cuts? >> i'm not here to scare people. i'm here to inform and also to let people begin to plan because they are going to see these impacts in their daily lives and they are going to have to adjust and make their arrangements accordingly. and it won't be like a shutdown where like turning
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)